Repost from @nytimes using @RepostRegramApp – America’s black mothers and babies are in a life-or-death crisis. Black infants in America are now more than twice as likely to die as white infants — a racial disparity that is actually wider than in 1850, 15 years before the end of slavery. In one year, that racial gap adds up to more than 4,000 lost black babies. Education and income offer little protection. In fact, a black woman with an advanced degree is more likely to lose her baby than a white woman with less than an 8th-grade education. Simone Landrum, who was photographed here by LaToya Ruby Frazier, lost a child in 2016. “‘I felt like giving up,” she said. Then she pictured the faces of her 2 young sons. “I thought, Who’s going to take care of them if I’m gone?” This tragedy of black infant mortality is intimately intertwined with another tragedy: a crisis of death and near death in black mothers themselves. The U.S. is one of only 13 countries in the world where the rate of maternal mortality is now worse than it was 25 years ago. According to Linda Villarosa, who reported this story for @nytmag, the answer has everything to do with the lived experience of being a black woman in America. Visit the link in our profile to read the entire story. #seebaby #seebabymidwifery #seebabygynecology #drbootstaylor #bringbirthback #birthoptions #atlantamidwifery #experienceexcellence www.seebaby.org

Repost from @nytimes using @RepostRegramApp – America’s black mothers and babies are in a life-or-death crisis. Black infants in America are now more than twice as likely to die as white infants — a racial disparity that is actually wider than in 1850, 15 years before the end of slavery. In one year, that racial gap adds up to more than 4,000 lost black babies. Education and income offer little protection. In fact, a black woman with an advanced degree is more likely to lose her baby than a white woman with less than an 8th-grade education. Simone Landrum, who was photographed here by LaToya Ruby Frazier, lost a child in 2016. “‘I felt like giving up,” she said. Then she pictured the faces of her 2 young sons. “I thought, Who’s going to take care of them if I’m gone?” This tragedy of black infant mortality is intimately intertwined with another tragedy: a crisis of death and near death in black mothers themselves. The U.S. is one of only 13 countries in the world where the rate of maternal mortality is now worse than it was 25 years ago. According to Linda Villarosa, who reported this story for @nytmag, the answer has everything to do with the lived experience of being a black woman in America. Visit the link in our profile to read the entire story.

#seebaby #seebabymidwifery #seebabygynecology #drbootstaylor #bringbirthback #birthoptions #atlantamidwifery #experienceexcellence
www.seebaby.org via SEE BABY https://ift.tt/2qxlGqI

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